The Holy Island of Lindisfarne.

It’s Sunday morning and all is quiet.  Time to reflect on my visit to Lindisfarne last week.

Tammi on the beach at Bamburgh

Tammi on the beach at Bamburgh

I decide it’s also the perfect time to draw an Oracle card from my Sacred Geometry Deck in response to a request from a dear friend.  After I have done that and sent her the result, I decide to draw one for myself.  This is the card that turned up for me.  Labyrinth.  (click on the image if you would like to read the message).

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Of course, this seems completely appropriate since I have just returned from my first ever visit to the Holy island of Lindisfarne, and the starting point for my equine pilgrimage next year.  (see the signage in my Pointing the Way post).  After attending the Pure Outdoor navigation course in the Peak District (previous post), I headed Northwards searching for the terminus point for the Pennine Bridleway near Kirby Stephen,

and I found it here

and I found it here

the views from this place are breathtaking

the views from this place are breathtaking

then on up to the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria across the wild and stunningly beautiful North York Moors,

the road stretches away over miles and miles of moorland occupied by a scattering of sheep.

the road stretches away over miles and miles of moorland occupied only by a scattering of sheep.

until by a happy chance, I found a lovely B&B, Glororum Farmhouse, to stay in just outside Bamburgh.  Here, Tammi and I enjoyed an evening stroll along the beach,

Bamburgh Castle in the fading light - or is that a big sand castle?

Bamburgh Castle in the fading light – or is that a big sand castle?  Notice the thin sliver of moon rising.

looking north towards Bamburgh Light house and a tiny pimple on the horizon that is Lindisfarne

looking north towards Bamburgh Light House and a tiny pimple on the horizon that is Lindisfarne

before heading for the fish and chip shop.

eating my fish and chips overlooking the harbour at Seahouses

eating my fish and chips overlooking the harbour at Seahouses

The following day, after checking with the local paper for safe crossing times,

notice in the Berwick Advertiser

notice in the Berwick Advertiser

I became a true tourist for the day and joined the throng to explore Lindisfarne,

yes, I am driving over the causeway (doing 19 miles and hour with bird poo on the windscreen) determined to photograph the Refuge Box.  I don’t think you could get many horses up there in an emergency!  They would have to swim, I suppose.

coming away with my souvenirs.

pebbles from the beach

pebbles from the beach (below)

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and some leaflets

and some leaflets

which makes for some interesting reading

which makes for some interesting reading

a diagram of the holy church of St Mary

with its detail of the holy church of St Mary

with a detail of it's pock-marked stone walls

and a close-up of its actual pock-marked stone walls

and the remains of the Abbey standing sentinel amongst the neatly mown grass lawn

and the ruined remains of Lindisfarne Priory, standing sentinel in a field.  Owned by English Heritage, you have to pay to visit this.

Walking over to the opposite side of the island reveals the Castle in all it’s glory.

the track to the castle

as we walk along the track to the castle

and the beach in front of the castle

and turn to admire the beach in front of it

with some explanation of its history

with some explanation of its history

I tried a couple of times to call into the vicarage to speak to the vicar having exchanged several emails with him already, without any joy.  Obviously, it was not meant to be for this visit.  With barely 3 hours spent on the island of Lindisfarne, Tammi and I turned and headed for the car, deposited in the huge car park earlier, and made our way back off the island, not a little relieved to be heading away from the madding crowd.  I was left wondering how I might go about finding the Holy part of Lindisfarne?  I think I may well find it in the Sacred Gospels, the original of which is housed in the British Library.

One thought on “The Holy Island of Lindisfarne.

  1. Pingback: Pointing the Way | The Artist as Pilgrim

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